Friday, January 18, 2019

Ang Gu Kueh Making @ Peranakan Museum

This fake miniature ang gu kueh making workshop was done in 2018 at The Peranakan Museum. All participants are age 50 and above.  After visiting the Museum, they handmade a pair of ang ku kueh and bring them home for souvenir. 






Happily making their ang ku kueh!


Very satisfied with their handmade fake ang gu kueh. 




Smile! a group picture was taken after the workshop. 

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Happy 2019 Handmade Miniature Singapore Local Food

Happy New Year! Welcome 2019! Wishing all of you a happy and fruitful 2019 ahead. 

Below are my recently handmade miniature ( all scale/size) local Singapore food. Hope you like it!

If you are interested in buying or learning , please visit my web: www.kinsminiature.com  for  more information. My workshop/showcase is at 24 Pagoda street near Chinatown Mrt Exit A out walk straight about 2 mins , inside a camera shop named Manly/Canon. Open daily 10 am to 6 pm.




My handmade Singapore local delight: mee robus , chicken rice, satay, fishball noodles , chicken biryani , dim sum etc. Material: Air Dry Clay



These fake local food really look real on the table



My handmade miniature dim sum set . 


My handmade miniature tsum tsum and hot pot clay. 



Singapore favourite  meal: fish ball mee/noodlels


My handmade miniature huat kueh, shou tau  (Longevity Bun) - for offering . 


My handmade miniature huat kueh.


Miniature food: abalone and cauliflower and mushroom. 


Miniature Local Nonya Kuehs kuehs 

Monday, November 5, 2018

Miniature Local Delights

These are my handmade miniature Singapore local delights: yusheng, yong tau foo, mian jiang kueh, dim sum  etc. These miniature clay food models are mini and cute and you can keep it for a very long time.


Miniature food


Mini Food Models: yong tau foo, mian jiang kueh, dim sum and yu sheng



Miniature fake food 


Singapore local delights: yu sheng and yong tau foo. 

Monday, October 15, 2018

Miniature Food

These are a few custom made miniature food items did recently.  Most of them are Singapore local food . Miniature popiah, wu xiang, kong ba bao, half boiled egg, kaya toast etc.




Miniature popiah, kong ba bao and wu xiang



My handmade miniature fake kong ba bao



My handmade miniature green tea, abalone and do hua



Singapore local breakfast: kaya toast, half boiled egg, curry puff , chicken drum stik and tea.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Miniature local food

These are my handmade miniature local Singapore food: nasi lemak, veggie bee hoon and typioca kueh. I used air dry clay to make all my miniature food . Beside food, you can use this type of clay to make other figurines such as dolls and animals.



Miniature food: nasi lemak, bee hoon and kueh


Singapore local food


Miniature food: nasi lemak with egg, hot dog, chicken wing , chili, cucumber etc. 
                                         

My handmade miniature nasi lemak

Friday, July 27, 2018

Miniature Singapore Local Delights

These are some of my handmade miniature Singapore local delights: yusheng, dim sum, yong tau foo, oranges and mian jiang kueh.



Miniature food


miniature yusheng


Mian jiang kueh peanut filling


Miniature clay mian jiang kuehs


National breakfast: kaya toast set in miniature size



Thursday, July 12, 2018

Miniature local Kueh

These are my handmade miniature local kueh: min jiang kueh and chwee kueh, for a breakfast and tea break item usually found in hawker centers.   No mold using, all handmade using air dry clay
The filling inside the min jiang kueh are the peanut, coconut and red bean paste.


My handmade miniature min jiang kueh with peanut, coconut and red bean paste. 




                                            My handmade miniature local snack: chwee kueh.
                                                    

Thursday, June 28, 2018

活到老学到老

Mdm Lim and her daughter came to me workshop last week to learn how to make miniature nonya kuehs (5 types) . She herself knows how to make real nonya kueh, so when I teach her how to use clay to  make into mini size , she has no problem in doing it. She said to me , this is very interesting and she love it so much.  Never feel too old to learn a new skill. 活到老学到老.




Mdm Lim and her daughter 


My most elderly student


Their master pieces: miniature nonya kuehs


Step by step , you can make it! @ kinsminiature workshop






Friday, June 22, 2018

Verlocal Diaries: Kin's Miniatures

Sean and Jonas came to my workshop last week . Below is the diary they did for me after the short interview with me.

Please visit the link below to view the video taken on that day.

https://medium.com/verlocalsg/verlocal-diaries-kins-minatures-820fc24c36dd

Verlocal Diaries: Kin’s Miniatures

Each week, “Verlocal Diaries” records the Verlocal team’s adventures to various classes conducted by our hosts. From the narration of our hosts’ stories to the thoughts of our fellow participants, we piece together everything we have experienced to create a long lasting memory in the form of a diary entry — that is both personal and shareable.

Dear Diary,
Today we headed to Kin’s Miniatures, tucked inside a camera shop at Chinatown. Kin’s Miniatures was started by Kin as a hobby when she was 42, spending 3 years developing and honing her clay modelling skills.
I’m sure you have seen the unimaginably realistic food mockups outside Japanese restaurants, but have you seen this done with local food?

We were behind the camera for today, filming a curry puff / tutu kueh accessory workshop. The 4 participants for today were a pair of friends, Mandy and Hannah, and siblings, Asabiel and Anabiel.
“I joined this workshop because I thought it was so cute, and it looked very interesting. I also wanted to learn a new skill as well.” — Hannah

Shaping and Colouring

Kin started off by introducing us to air dry clay, which hardens when exposed to air as the moisture inside evaporates. When the clay is not being worked on, it’s placed in cling wrap to ensure that it doesn’t harden.
The base colour of the clay was white, so to colour the clay, acrylic paint was kneaded into it. After some kneading, the clay’s colour would magically change.
For its shape, Kin demonstrated how the clay should be kneaded into a perfect ball at first, before shaping it into the desired form.
Now that the basics were explained, time to get working!

Down to the Details

After shaping and colouring their foods, it was time to add the details! This was the most important part of the process as it determined whether the model was realistic or not.
The toothpick was the tool of choice this round. It was used to create the ridges around the entire tutu keuh. For the curry puff, the toothpick was used to pull and shape the swirls at the edges that formed the crust.
Mandy recalls this being her favourite part of the workshop
“I enjoyed carving out the crust of the curry puff, the waves.” — Mandy
This part proved to be the most challenging, with quite some time spent perfecting the details. However, the good thing about working with clay is that you can keep trying again and again until you get it right.
Kin also shared with us that we could use the actual tutu kueh mold as a template for a life-size tutu kueh model. It’s interesting that we can make use of real-life food molds for clay modelling (but it wouldn’t be a miniature anymore, would it)

Glazing and Gluing

Now on to the finishing touches. Banana leaves were rolled for the tutu kueh’s base, while a semi-shiny glaze was applied to the curry puff. This gave it a nice oily sheen which added to its realism.
After this, the final products were transformed into accessories, ranging from rings, earrings, and badges.
As you can see, the varnish adds a nice sheen to the food, giving it an additional textured finish! Common varnishes like nail polish can also be also be used to achieve this effect.

Final Thoughts

The workshop was carried out smoothly and everyone was happy with what they made. Kin was always there to guide and give pointers on the process.
“I really enjoyed the workshop. Kin was very patient in teaching us, helping us correct our works. We also get a chance to really see our effort being translated into jewellery which you can use in the future.” — Hannah
I feel that creating clay miniatures with local food is a fun and creative way to express our local culture. With our food culture being so rich and diverse, there an endless amount of food we can miniaturise! Apart from curry puffs and tutu kueh, Kin also holds miniature workshops for dishes like chicken rice, bentos and even tsum tsum figurines!
Start your fake food journey here 🍱🍔🍰
Take a look at more of Kin’s amazing creations in our feature video below!
https://www.facebook.com/VerlocalSG/videos/1962018863816445/




Saturday, June 16, 2018

Miniature Food Theme Jewellery Making Class


Dive into the world of miniatures with this 1.5-hour food-themed jewellery  making workshop. You will learn how to make miniature renditions of local foods such as char siew pau, tutu kueh, or curry puff from scratch without using mould castings and then craft them into a matching earring and ring set. Take home your finished product and wear it proudly!





Handmade Miniature Food Jewellery


Handmade miniature tutu kueh , curry puff ear rings and rings


Wear it proudly because is your art work !






  






Handmade miniature food jewellery  @ kin's miniature workshop